Weekly Wrap-Up // 02

WEEKLYWRAPUP

Happy Friday! Today we’re hosting another weekly wrap-up, where periodically we share our favorite posts, articles, videos, and stories from around the web. We want to focus on the positive things that people are doing to impact their communities – whether that’s supported employment, equality for those with disabilities, giving, or speaking out for the voiceless in our society – and leave you ready for the weekend with a smile on your face. Which shouldn’t be too hard considering it’s Friday and the weekend is supposed to be GORGEOUS.

Mock CVS Store Helps Adults With Developmental Disabilities Train for Jobs

Much like our training center will do upon its completion, this store gives adults with developmental disabilities the chance to learn hands-on skills that will prepare them for working lives and greater independence. Right on!

March is National Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month! 

Learn more about what this month means and why it’s so important.

5th-Graders Ditch Recess for Sign Language Club So They Can Chat With Deaf Classmate

Somebody take these kids out for ice cream, STAT.

Chick-Fil-A Has the Answer to Our Communication Problem

Chick-Fil-A has just introduced cell phone coops, cardboard boxes created for families to put their cell phones aside during meal time. And (BONUS!) if they complete the challenge, theyget free Ice Dreams. (Okay, tell the kids learning sign language they need to go to Chick-Fil-A.)

Did you like our post this week? Share it with your friends on social media using #GCRCWeeklyWrapUp! You can follow us on Twitter and Instagram @GCRCOfficial and Like us on Facebook, too. Have a great weekend!

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What She Understood

Maya Angelou Blog Post

“If you are always trying to be normal, you will never know how amazing you can be.” – Maya Angelou

Words are our most powerful weapon. With words, we can build up and strengthen; we can tear down and destroy. This is not a new idea. But it is, perhaps, an idea overlooked. How often do we actually speak with intention? How much do our words represent the goodness of our souls, rather than our fleeting emotions? What are we giving back when we open our mouths or put pen to paper? In a digital age where smart phones have overtaken the cultural landscape and shifted our perception of communication, we ask ourselves: How can this be a positive thing? It certainly isn’t going away. So what can we do to ensure healthy, meaningful connections are formed in light of this change? We don’t fight it. We use it.

We use it to share a Tweet that, in just 140 characters, brings encouragement to someone in the form of a joke, a good news article, or an uplifting blog post. We use it to send smiling photos and heart emojis and Snapchats with our best friends singing our favorite songs. We use it to tell others that they are valuable just the way they are…and they haven’t been forgotten. We become fierce with our love and our words. We just do it differently these days.

Maya Angelou understood the power of words. As a world-renowned poet, author, civil-rights activist, and former U.S. Poet Laureate, she used them to transcend the division we create amongst ourselves and bring about an awareness of shared values and beliefs. She once declared, “By demonstrating that all peoples cry, laugh, eat, worry, and die, it can introduce the idea that if we try and understand each other, we may even become friends”We’re all people. The deaf, the blind, the hearing, the disabled, the black, the white, the heartbroken, the optimist, the thinker, the feeler. Each of us is evidence of something greater, handcrafted to represent one part of a whole body. So there is inherent value in our differences because they all work together. Or at least they can if we let them.

Angelou leaves behind a legacy of advocacy through words. And while she certainly fought for equality and justice in other ways, her greatest gift was sharing the simple truth that we are all equipped with a powerful weapon.

And it’s up to us how we want to use it.